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Introduction
Procedure Descriptions
 
Adenoidectomy (Adenoid Removal)
Bunionectomy
Colonoscopy
Hammertoe Repair
Heel Surgery
Laser Removal of Lesions & Warts
Septoplasty (Nasal Septum Repair)
Tonsillectomy
Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
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For Patients:  Procedure Descriptions

Adenoidectomy (Adenoid Removal)

Adenoidectomy is the surgical removal of the adenoid glands, which are located between the nasal airway and the back of the throat. This surgery is often done in conjunction with a tonsillectomy.

While the patient is under general anesthesia, the ENT surgeon props open the patient’s mouth with a small instrument. The adenoid tissue is cauterized or removed with a curette or a microdebrider. Bleeding is controlled with packing or cauterization.

Bunionectomy

Bunionectomy, A bunion is a painful deformity of the bones and joint between the foot and the big toe. Long-term irritation caused by poorly fitting and/or high-heeled shoes, arthritis, or heredity causes the joint to thicken and enlarge. This causes the big toe to angle in toward and over the second toe, the foot bone (metatarsal) to angle out toward the other foot, and the skin to thicken
Surgical removal of a bunion is usually done while the patient is under general anesthesia and rarely requires a hospital stay. An incision is made along the bones of the big toe into the foot. The deformed joint and bones are repaired, and the bones are stabilized with a pin and/or cast.

Colonoscopy

A Colonoscopy enables the physician to look inside a patient’s entire large intestine. This procedure is used to look for early signs of cancer in the colon and rectum, as well, as diagnose the causes of unexplained bowel habits.

Before the procedure, the patient is usually given a mild sedative. While the patient lies on their left side, the physician will inset a long, flexible, lighted tube into the patient’s rectum and slowly guide it into the colon. The tube, called a colonoscope, transmits an image of inside the colon and can inflate the colon with air to help the physician see clearly.

The physician can remove all or part of an abnormality using tiny instruments passed through the scope. If there is bleeding, the physician can pass an instrument through the scope to stop the bleeding or inject medicine.

Hammertoe Repair

Hammertoe is a bending of one or both joints of a toe. This deformity can put excessive pressure on the toe resulting in pain and discomfort.

Arthroplasty is the most common surgical procedure to correct hammertoe. In this procedure, the surgeon straightens the toe by removing a small section of the bone from the affected joint.

Arthrodesis is another option to correct hammertoe. This procedure is usually reserved for the more severe cases. In this procedure, the surgeon fuses a small joint in the toe to straighten it. A pin is typically used to hold the toe in position while the bone is healing.

Other procedures may be necessary in more severe cases, including skin wedging (the removal of wedges of skin), tendon/muscle rebalancing or lengthening, small tendon transfers, or relocation of surrounding joints.

Heel Surgery

Two common conditions that can cause pain to the bottom of the heel are plantar fasciitis and heel spur(s). Although there are many causes of heel pain in children and adults, most can be effectively treated without surgery. When chronic heel pain fails to respond to conservative treatment, surgical care may be warranted.

Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of a fibrous band of tissue in the bottom of the foot that extends from the heel bone to the toes. This tissue can become inflamed for many reasons, most commonly from irritation by placing too much stress (such as excess running and jumping) on the bottom of the foot.

Heel Spur(s) or heel spur syndrome are most often the result of stress on the muscles and fascia of the foot. This stress may form a spur on the bottom of the heel. While many spurs are painless others may produce chronic pain.

Reconstructive surgery of the foot and ankle consists of complex surgical repair(s) that may be necessary to regain function or stability, reduce pain, and/or prevent further deformity or disease. Many of these cases may require any of the following: tendon repair/transfer, fusion of bone, joint implantation, bone grafting, skin or soft tissue repair, tumor excision, amputation and/or the osteotomy of bone (cutting of bones in a precise fashion). Bone screws, pins, wires, staples, and other fixation devices (both internal and external), and casts may be utilized to stabilize and repair bone in reconstructive procedures.

Laser Removal of Lesions & Warts

Laser surgery uses a laser light source to remove diseased tissues or treat bleeding blood vessels. A laser is a light beam that can be precisely focused. It is used to treat tissues by heating the targeted cells until they "burst". There are several types of lasers, including the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser, the YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser, and the pulsed dye laser. Each laser has specific uses. The color of the laser (light beam) used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue being treated.

Septoplasty (Nasal Septum Repair)

Septoplasty is an operation that corrects defects and deformities of the wall between the two nostrils (nasal septum). The goal of this surgery is to straighten the nasal septum or to relieve obstructions or others problems related to deviation of the septum.

An incision is made internally on one side of the nasal septum. The mucous membrane is lifted away from the cartilage and the obstructive parts are removed or repositioned. Then the mucous member is returned to its original position and held in place with stitches or packing.

Tonsillectomy

Tonsillectomy (Tonsil Removal) is the surgical removal of the tonsils, which are glands located at the back of the throat. Normally, tonsil glands serve as agents against infection. In some people, however, especially children, these glands can cause ear and throat infections. While the patient is under general anesthesia, the ENT surgeon removes the tonsils with an instrument or cautery (burning device), which controls bleeding. The cut heals naturally without stitches.

Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

The Upper Gastrointestinal Series uses x-rays to diagnose problems in the esophagus, stomach, duodenum, and, in some cases, the small intestine. This procedure can show blockage, abnormal growth, ulcers, or a malfunction in the organ.

Before the procedure, the patient will drink a thick, white, milkshake-like liquid called Barium. This liquid coats the inside lining of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum, so they can be clearly seen on x-rays. A physician will examine these x-rays for abnormalities.

With the assistance of a fluoroscope, the physician can also watch the digestive system work as the barium moves through it. This part of the procedures helps identify any problems in the digestive system’s functions.

   
   
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